USCTs

Crater 150

It’s been a long day. I will share some thoughts at another time. For now I will leave you with this photograph of the 22nd USCT’s regimental flag. The reenacting unit took part in today’s ceremony at the Crater Read more

Today the NYTs Disunion page features an essay by Richard Slotkin on the Crater and the story of the “colored” Fourth Division. I recommend his book on the battle, though the source material utilized is very limited. The following passage about the battle cry of the black soldiers caught my attention. Union officers used that Read more

Continuing with the theme of desertion [and here] from the past week here is a fascinating passage from Heny McNeal Turner, who served as an army chaplain for the United States Colored Troops. The following excerpt was written at Harrison’s Landing, Virginia on September¬† 18, 1864 and appeared in The Christian Recorder a week later Read more

It’s not until September 26, but I am super stoked about receiving an invitation to speak at the 2014 Conference on Illinois History in Springfield. I’ve never been to Lincoln’s home town. Even better, I was asked to speak about Private Louis Martin, who as you can see was seriously injured at the battle of Read more

Today’s Washington Post features an essay on the Crater by Forstchen and Gingrich, which focuses on the men of the Fourth Division. You may remember that two co-authored a work of historical fiction on the battle back in 2011. Shortly after its publication I was invited by the Atlantic to review the book. Needless to Read more

Today is the 150th anniversary of the Fort Pillow Massacre. Should it be remembered as a Confederate massacre of black soldiers, a moment in the long history of racial violence between black and white Americans or both Read more

Update: In my rush to finish the sources section at the end of the guest post I left out one important article by Carole Emberton, which has been incredibly influential on how I think about the connection between black Union soldiers, violence, and Reconstruction. “Only Murder Makes Men: Reconsidering the Black Military Experience,” Journal of Read more

In 2011 I took part in a panel on the myth of the black Confederate soldier with Emmanuel Dabney, Ervin Jordan, and Jaime Martinez at the annual meeting of the ASALH in Richmond. I thoroughly enjoyed the experience, but I did not attend the Carter G. Woodson luncheon featuring Daryl Michael Scott. The topic of Read more

What follows is a very rough draft of the opening section of an essay that explores white Union perceptions of United States Colored Troops who fought at the Crater. Please feel free to comment and be as critical as you like. I very much appreciate it. On July 9, 1864 Frank Leslie’s Illustrated featured on Read more