H.K. Edgerton Marches Through Texas

Looks like our favorite black Confederate is on the move again and this time in Midland, Texas.  H.K. Edgerton is out to demonstrate the history of loyalty that slaves showed to their masters and the Confederacy.  This little passage in a recent news item caught my attention:

Edgerton, a former president for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in North Carolina, said that during his 2002 march he was able to stop along the way to talk to people.   He told them of the “black heroes” that fought alongside Confederate soldiers during the war.   His Web site states that 50,000 African-Americans served willingly and that almost four million stayed behind to care for the plantations and farms in the South out of their own free will. This information is what Edgerton wants students to be aware of; his organization Southern Heritage 411 says that their mission is to reveal the truth of those who helped to support the South in the struggle for independence.

So, we are to believe that 50,000 African Americans served in Confederate ranks and 4 million stayed behind to care for their masters.  Meanwhile , yesterday my students took the opportunity to read R. E. Lee’s 1865 letter in support of the utilization of black southerners in the ranks.  I’m sure Lee would have been surprised and pleased to hear that 50,000 were already openly serving in his and other armies (LOL).  I would love to know where the 200,000 black Union soldiers were pulled from and the thousands of fugitive slaves that flocked to the armies as they made their way through the South.  Don’t hold your breadth for an answer.

7 thoughts on “H.K. Edgerton Marches Through Texas

  1. Chris Paysinger

    I admit that I have only casually followed this debate, on this blog and from other sources. I guess I dismiss the assertion that slaves were falling all over themselves to help the CSA as to be wholly ridiculous. But Edgarton’s assertions are amazing. I admit that in history it is far too simple to misinterpret numbers and events. But some seem pretty damn airtight. Like the fact that Lee’s army’s numbers were equaled by the number of black Confederates…that would seem fairly obvious that it is false. Where does Edgarton believe this “lost” army to have been those four years? I can say emphatically that they were not in North Alabama. And that the slaves here deserted every chance they got…..Chris

    Reply
  2. Scooter

    Why stop at 50,000? Hey, this guy is writing revisionist history, why stumble over any facts at all? He should just say it was an even million.

    Reply
  3. Frank

    Having studied this time period in college and beyond it is hard to state exact numbers, but yes there is truth to the fact that more then first thought black Confederates did fight for the South. I had family on both sides but can say what is taught in our schools is far from the truth during that time period, my sons own history teacher admitted to me what was taught about the Civil War was not accurate in many aspects.

    Reply

Join the Conversation