What Do You Get When You Combine a Singer from Michigan, a German Audience, and a Song About Alabama?

[Hat Tip to Charles Lovejoy]

You get a celebration of Southern heritage. I assume most people will watch this video with a sense of pride as the South’s favorite son brings the Confederate flag and Lynyrd Skynyrd’s “Sweet Home Alabama” to stages around the world. What they probably don’t know, however, is that Kid Rock was born in Romeo, Michigan in 1971. Even more interesting is the fact that a native of Michigan is singing a song composed by an Alabama-based band, which was written in response to Canadian, Neil Young, and his song, “Southern Man” – a song critical of race relations in the South.

Since I think Kid Rock pretty much sucks, I thought I might provide a link to the real deal.

About the author: Thank you for taking the time to read this post. What next? Scroll down and join the discussion in the comments section. Looking for more Civil War content? You can follow me on Twitter. Check out my forthcoming book, Searching For Black Confederates: The Civil War’s Most Persistent Myth, which is the first book-length analysis of the black Confederate myth ever published. Pre-order your copy today.

4 comments… add one
  • John Cummings Dec 23, 2008 @ 4:47

    Rest assured that Hank Williams the 3rd can’t stand the Kid either.
    http://www.snopes.com/music/artists/kidrock.asp

  • TF Smith Dec 23, 2008 @ 7:59

    I always thought “Marching Through Georgia” would lend itself to a rock arrangement…

  • Richard Dec 23, 2008 @ 8:16

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8l5oHDYISBc
    I have always thought this was an interesting rendition.

    Its to bad Skynyrd will always be known for the battle flag. I believe Ronnie Van Zant made a comment when he was in Wales about Europeans and the Confederate Flag. He said “They love that macho sh*t” if I remember correctly. I have always thought the use of the battle flag was just a marketing gimmick. Like Ozzy Osbourne wearing a cross around his neck or using the cross in his concerts. Same is true for Kid Rock, making a dollar.

  • Kevin Levin Dec 23, 2008 @ 12:28

    Thanks for the links guys. I especially enjoyed the Reuben Stoddard version. It’s interesting to think about how his appropriation of the song alters its meaning.

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