City of Chambersburg Welcomes Confederate Invasion

On July 20, 2014 the city of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania will commemorate the 150th anniversary of the ransoming and burning of the city by Confederate forces. This is not the first time that the city has engaged in such a remembrance. It looks like a tasteful commemoration that will likely both educate and bring together the community in and around Chambersburg.

[Uploaded to YouTube on April 12, 2014]

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I know this will not be the first time a place has commemorated being the victim of a violent action. Maybe it’s not true but I’ve heard of banks that practically celebrate that they were once robbed by Bonnie and Clyde or John Dillinger. The only problem with things like that for me is that they tend to make the offender seem like the hero.

I know this will not be the first time a place has commemorated being the victim of a violent action.

Interesting. Where in the video do you see this commemoration as framed around the city as victim?

“Interesting. Where in the video do you see this commemoration as framed around the city as victim?”

The video points out that 500 buildings were destroyed and 2000 people were left homeless. I would call that victimization. But in fairness, the program is being billed as “a living history portrayal of devastation and rebirth.”

As I’ve pointed out to you before, I am a Civil War reenactor; though I don’t expect I will be attending this particular event, but not because I’m trying to boycott it. My point was just that I find it interesting that a place would celebrate the violent action that occurred against it. But I guess this goes back to the question of why reenact? Anyway, I hope the event is a good one; I hope attendees learn something about the war and I especially hope that people don’t walk away with an impression of McCausland and his Confederate soldiers as some sort of valiant, Robin Hood-wannabe saviors, as many have glorified the Confederacy.

Thanks for the follow up. I just don’t get the sense that the goal is to reinforce feelings of victimization. It would be interesting to know how many people can actually trace their histories to the Civil War era in Chambersburg. Looks like the city has found a creative way to highlight an important moment in its history.

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