Merry Confederate Christmas 2015

This Mort Kunstler print is titled, “How Real Soldiers Live,” but it is begging for a caption. Have at it.

Kunstler ChristmasWishing all of you Happy Holidays and a very Happy New Year.

32 thoughts on “Merry Confederate Christmas 2015

  1. Bob Huddleston

    Typical — officers inside with the food and the girls while the sentry tries to stay warm in the snow! And an optimistic uniform: instead of an overcoat, I suspect he would have been wearing an old blanket over his shoulders!

    And may you have a Great New Year!

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  2. Barbara Gannon

    1) This is like Hogwarts, the food appeared by Magic, I wonder who made it and served it?
    2) My dearest Mary, last night I was on guard duty, with no shoes or even a decent meal; what gave me great comfort is knowing that one day my great great grandchildren will realize how much I suffered to preserve slavery and our way of life and not think we are fighting this calamitous war for something really trivial like tariffs or taxes.
    3) Guard: What a bunch of brass hat ASSWIPES I hope no one makes them the heroes of this war!

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  3. London John

    Where the bars cross second from bottom first from left appears to be tactfully cxoncealing t5he face of a woman in an apron, presumably a slave.

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  4. Pat Young

    “He’s a dead man for leaving me out in the snow. Revenge is a dish best served cold…as cold as I am tonight.

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  5. Bryan Cheeseboro

    This is the Christmas 1862 party that’s depicted in the movie “Gods & Generals.” That depiction is funny because it completely airbrushes out slavery, i.e., who cooked and served the food. I did some research and learned that may of the slaves from this plantation (Moss Neck Manor) had run off and the food for this feast was prepared by Jim Lewis and another Black man.

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    1. Ken Noe

      It’s nice that Lewis could find a modern Butterball instead of a scrawny nineteenth century bird. Kroger must have been open.

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  6. London John

    SFAIK Kunstler (is that his real name? German for artist) is unknown in the UK except to followers of CWM. Is his confederate kitsch big in the US? The Thomas Kincaid of the Civil War? I looked at several of his pictures online, and a minor but inescapable point is the inaccurate dresses of the many southern ladies. Not only are these dresses never patched or faded (which would have made his sentimental point better) but often have the vivid, unnatural colours only possible with chemical dyes. The only chemical dye available at the time of the ACW was Mauve, the first anilene dye.

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    1. Julian

      Mort’s sense of fashion is always highly inaccurate in its style – he does better with the scantily clad babes of the far east but as for colours perhaps less inaccurate as there were several artificial pigments available by the time of the US Civil War as well as Perkins mauve – Solferino is a pale reddish pink fond in 1859 but the name is also associated with Azo Yellow available since about 1862, Bismarck Brown around 1864 and Bleu de Lyon 1860 (Aniline Blue) Fuchsine 1858 – I have a doll of US origins (German head and limbs, assembled and dressed in US) dressed in a fashion that would be from the early 1960s and she has a Bleu de Lyon toned silk dress – Civil War fashion was transformed by the expanding colour palette of artificial dyes

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  7. J.A.Morrow

    Kunstler depends on art sales to support himself.
    He’s also “Civil War apolitical”…
    Your anti-Southern rant website is an inappropriate venue to portray Kuenstler’s work-and he’s been advised of his art being misused to ridicule…….
    The Provost-Customs House,in Charleston, has much of Kunstlers art displayed on its walls-gratis-and that will NOW be addressed as to further continuing having his paintings displayed.
    I think Kuenstler is unaware that you are misusing his work-and I hope he brings legal suit against yourself and this (hate) website.

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