Stonewall’s ‘Good ol Boys’

General Lee

Just a few days ago President Obama announced the creation of the Stonewall National Monument as the newest addition to America’s National Park System. The police raid and community response that took place at the Stonewall Inn on this day, June 28, 1969, is often credited as sparking the modern LGBT civil rights movement in the United States.

Apparently, someone decided to mark this event with a fitting re-design of the iconic Dukes of Hazzard car, known as “The General Lee.”

Love it.

[H/T to Keith Harris]

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25 comments… add one
  • Leslie Ackel Jun 28, 2016

    Lovely. I can’t get over it, I swear…

  • Scott Ledridge Jun 28, 2016

    That pop you just heard was Cooter’s head exploding.

  • Meg Jun 28, 2016

    So just how did the Stonewall Inn get its name in the first place? I am pretty sure Bernard Bee didn’t have anything to do with it.

    • Erick Hare Jun 28, 2016

      Bernard Bee had everything to do with the naming of the Inn because without the naming of the Inn’s namesake the Inn would have an entirely different name (ie the Jackson Inn).

    • Kevin Levin Jun 28, 2016

      It was originally called the Stone Wall Inn.

  • Matt Jun 28, 2016

    Yeah , the duke boys were such bigots and racist. This makes total sense. Not. Maybe they should have put a picture of the unions great Calvary soldier Custer on top. Oh wait, he massacred native Americans who ended up executing the racist bigot. Now, be a good old boy and delete my comment.

    • Andy Hall Jun 28, 2016

      Custer was a top? Okay.

    • Ken Noe Jun 28, 2016

      The soldiers at Calvary were Romans. Just saying.

      • TFSmith Jun 29, 2016

        Andy and Ken win the thread…

        Best,

    • Erick Hare Jun 28, 2016

      I don’t see exactly how Custer fighting Native Americans after the war has anything to do with a discussion about issues pertaining to the Civil War and long lasting consequences. It has nothing to do with the topic other than the fact that Custer fought for the Union in the Civil War.

      Simply pointing out a separate issue in United States history does not invalidate the facts about the Civil War and its legacy.

      • Kevin Levin Jun 28, 2016

        It’s called deflection and this is a really bad example of it.

        • Erick Hare Jun 28, 2016

          Yes, I’m simply pointing out the obvious. At least he gets some credit for referencing an actual figure in the Civil War despite how badly he references Custer.

    • Mark Snell Jun 28, 2016

      Matt(patt),
      Kevin would never delete your comment unless it was offensive. Luckily, he does not censor guys like you who only offend the English language. Now, in the words of W. C. Fields: “Go away kid. Ya’ bother me.” Here’s another Fields’ quote that you might like: “I am free of all prejudice. I hate everyone equally.”

  • Matt McKeon Jun 28, 2016

    Have you lost your god damned mind? Its cavalry, not Calvary, and no I’m not going to explain where that is.
    Cooter’s head wouldn’t explode at all. A great calmness would come over him, and a singing in his heart, to know he wouldn’t have to pretend anymore, that he would be accepted as he is. He would turn to the Duke boys and quietly say. “Boys, people been wonderin’ why two good lookin’ fellers in tight jeans, flannel shirts and blow dried hair spend all their time tinkerin’ with an old Dodge. I’m out and I’m proud…its time the Duke boys stopped runnin’ and took a stand.” The two rascals would stand tall and one would say, “I ain’t tired of running from Boss Hogg: but I’m tired of runnin’ from what I am.” “Damn straight,” the other would reply, “meaning in this context, I’m also gay.”

    • Scott Ledridge Jun 28, 2016

      Clarity is key in such moments.

    • Glad to see you know how to spell where my Lord and Savior was crucified.

      Exodus 20:7
      You shall not take the name of the Lord, your God, in vain, for the Lord will not hold blameless anyone who takes His name in vain.

  • Thomas Jun 28, 2016

    Robert E. Lee would never have desired all the publicity from the Dukes of Hazard tv show complete with Confederate battle flag and his name on the car. I am not troubled by the repainting and renaming of the car. I do regret though that I have met too many people in my life that have drawn judgments about his character (and Jackson’s as well) without studying his life.

    • Andy Hall Jun 28, 2016

      The apparent reverence paid the the Dukes of Hazzard and the “General Lee” as a cultural talisman is simply bizarre. The entire show was a string of southern stereotypes, played for yucks. Characters had names like Cooter, Cletus, and Lulu.

      Have they forgotten that the full name of the series villain was Jefferson Davis Hogg?

      • Shoshana Bee Jun 28, 2016

        What would I do without your insight, Andy? I would miss out on so much of the heart and soul that defines the lunacy of the resident contrarian(s).

        doorMatt: Dude, as the resident Indian here: Gimme a break on the Custer rant. We just celebrated Custer Day on the 24th and it was a hoot: We have the best damn editorial cartoons that come out this time of year, and yer spoiling the afterglow.

  • Scott Ledridge Jun 28, 2016

    “The apparent reverence paid the the Dukes of Hazzard and the “General Lee” as a cultural talisman is simply bizarre.” – 4-9 year old me bought it. Hook, line, and sinker. To this day, I still hate Dallas. I wanted another episode of the Dukes.

    • Shoshana Bee Jun 29, 2016

      Talking to my assistant about all this Dukes of Hazzard veneration, and he rolls his eyes and says:

      “And I suppose that the white supremacists all gather around episodes of Hogan’s Heroes, too???”

  • Mannie Gentile Jun 28, 2016

    So anyway…up until this week I got to say that I worked at the newest National Park Service unit – the Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument. Now having to say “the second newest” just doesn’t have the same punch.

  • David Kent Jun 29, 2016

    Hehehe………..thanks Kevin.

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