Just finished writing about this wonderful print published by the New York engraver John Chester Buttre. Many of you are no doubt familiar with Prayer in “Stonewall” Jackson’s Camp (1866). Buttre essentially stole it from an earlier sketch done by Adalbert Johann Volck.

Buttre made a number of changes, including adding Confederate Generals Richard S. Ewell and A.P. Hill. He made it a point, however, to keep Jackson’s camp slave, Jim Lewis, in the scene. I have to believe that Buttre intentionally placed Hill in this disinterested pose given his relationship with Jackson.

The chromiolithograph featured in the headline above was published in London in 1871 and was based on Conrad Wise Chapman’s painting The Fifty-Ninth Virginia Infantry–Wise’s Brigade (1867).

I am on the hunt for other wartime and postwar engravings, lithographs, etc. that include camp slaves. Thanks for your help.

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  1. The Library of Virginia has a series of 12 illustrations, probably by Confederate veteran William L. Shepard, identified as “Life Scenes of A Confederate Soldier” (I also have a set). One of these is labeled “The Camp Darkey.” Another has the caption “Good Times 1861,” which includes a servant bringing a dish to a sumptuous soldiers’ meal. Also, the article by veteran Allen C. Redwood, “The Cook in the Confederate Army,” includes several illustrations by the author. One, titled “Dress Parade,” shows a group of African Americans gathered in a camp, clad in parts of uniforms, and being drilled by one of their number. All are armed with sticks. This appeared in Scribner’s Magazine, 4, vol. 18, pp. 560-569, August 1879. A link to the article is in the comments section of the deadconfederates.com blog post “Were Cooks Enlisted in the Confederate Army?,” of July 17, 2011.

    • Hi Mike,

      Great to hear from you and Happy New Year. Thanks for the LVA reference. Andy actually sent along the Scribner’s piece yesterday, which I missed.

      • You’re welcome, Kevin. Another take on this by William L. Sheppard is “Confederate Camp-Servant on the March,” page 531 of “Battles and Leaders of the Civil War,” vol. II (NY, 1884, ’87, ’88). Not a flattering depiction of the subject.

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