Some Thoughts About Indexing

Thanks to those of you who offered suggestions on how to go about indexing a book.  Yesterday I finished with a first pass over the manuscript.  While I certainly have a clearer appreciation of those of you who suggested I hire a professional indexer, I can’t tell you how happy I am that I decided Read more

If I could do it all over again I would earn a degree in public history and work for the National Park Service at a historic site.  Over the past ten years I’ve had a number of opportunities to help out with various NPS projects and the work is always rewarding.  It has given me Read more

I wonder if the Confederate Heritage folks will rally around Thomas Buhls, who earlier today tried to celebrate Confederate heritage in Indiana with a sign that read, “CELEBRATE YOUR WHITE HERITAGE.”  I have no idea whether Mr. Buhls is a native southerner, but of course that shouldn’t matter much.  Confederate heritage transcends race, gender, and Read more

I was hoping that yesterday’s post would not turn into another round of the same old back and forth over the cause of the war, but that is exactly what happened.  Unfortunately, most of what is usually offered in such discussions lacks any serious analysis and/or context.  I was hoping to encourage readers to share Read more

Indexing Tips

Well, I just finished reading through the page proofs for my Crater book.  Now all that stands between me and a finished book is the index.  I have the formatting guidelines in front of me, but I would love to know what is the best way to proceed from those of you who have done Read more

To commemorate the sesquicentennial of the Civil War and Emancipation, the Gilder Lehrman Center’s 2012 David Brion Davis Lectures on the History of Slavery, Race, and Their Legacies features a roundtable discussion with five major historians and writers, moderated by GLC Director, David W. Blight. The group takes up questions of the changing character and Read more

Do You Trust Those Lost Causers?

I recently offered some brief thoughts about Robert K. Krick’s concerns about historians, who are supposedly weary of Confederate memoirs.  While I focused my remarks on a specific claim made by Krick about how historians interpret Robert E. Lee’s wartime popularity, his broader point about postwar accounts is worth a brief mention as well. The Read more