Goodbye, Cliopatria

with (left to right) Ralph Luker, Mark Grimsley, and Becky Goetz at the 2007 meeting of the SHA in Richmond

Today I was sad to learn that Ralph Luker is closing up shop over at HNN’s Cliopatria blog.  Ralph has been blogging since before I was born – I mean my blog, of course.  Early on it was the place to be seen and I certainly benefited from Ralph’s encouragement and support from making it on to the blogroll to the occasional hyperlink, and most notably receiving the Cliopatria Award for Best Individual Blog in 2007.  Thanks to the many distinguished bloggers who made Cliopatria home over the years and thanks especially to Ralph for his hard work and commitment to maintaining the site.  It is safe to say that Ralph is largely responsible for encouraging academics to blog and for giving the format the respectability it deserves.

Washington – Lincoln Day in Virginia

"Lincoln's Drive Through Richmond" by Dennis M. Carter

Update – 01/24: Yesterday the bill was stricken from the Senate’s calendarUpdate: Head on over to Robert Moore’s site for some thoughtful commentary on Lincoln’s connection to the Shenandoah Valley. Turns out that the Lincoln family’s roots are deep.

The Virginia General Assembly is considering a bill that would designate the third Monday in February as Washington – Lincoln Day.

The third Monday in February – George Washington-Lincoln Day to honor George Washington (1732-1799), the first President of the United States, and Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), the Great Emancipator.

This makes perfect sense given the Lincoln’s family’s roots in Virginia as well as the importance that many Virginians attach to his entry into Richmond in April 1865 and the end of slavery.

Carter’s painting is on display at the American Civil War Center at Tredegar in Richmond through April 2012.

Your Email

This morning I awoke to a pretty nasty private email from a reader who was disappointed that I did not take the time to respond.  I certainly understand the frustration, but while I do my best to respond to as many blog comments as possible, I simply cannot respond to each and every private email that I receive.  On average I receive somewhere around 20 emails a day and on some days it can double and even triple.  It would be impossible for me to get anything constructive done if I responded to each and every email.  That said, I do read your email messages and I do appreciate you taking the time to write.  Thanks for your understanding.

Chapter Titles

First, a big shout out to my new friends at the Olde Colony Civil War Round Table in Dedham.  I had a wonderful time last night.  It was an enthusiastic crowd and they asked some excellent questions.  The meeting was brought to order by the ringing of a bell that was used to signal the end of the war on Boston Common.  Very, very cool.  The Endicott Estate is an ideal place in which to give a talk and I look forward to my return in May to talk about the battle of the Crater.

Speaking of the Crater, I finished reviewing the publisher’s copy edits and finalized the chapter titles, which are as follows:

  • Chapter 1 – The Battle: “Until Every Negro Has Been Slaughtered”
  • Chapter 2 – The Lost Cause: Maintaining the Antebellum Hierarchy
  • Chapter 3 – Virginia’s Reconstruction: William Mahone, “The Hero of the Crater”
  • Chapter 4 – Reinforcing the Status Quo: Reenactment and Jim Crow
  • Chapter 5 – Whites Only: The Ascendency of An Interpretation
  • Chapter 6 – Competing Memories: Civil War and Civil Rights
  • Chapter 7 – Moving Forward: Integrating a Black Counter-Memory

Despite the release date on the book’s Amazon page it looks like the book will be available by June 1.