A Good Year For Silas Chandler

I absolutely love this photo.  Pictured below are two generations of the Chandler-Sampson family taking the time over the holidays to learn about their famous ancestor.  The photo conveys the power of history and reinforces my firm belief that what we do as historians matters.  I am sure my co-author, Myra Chandler Sampson, agrees.  There is still time to pick up the most recent issue of Civil War Times at your local newsstand.  I think it is safe to say that 2011 was a good year for Silas Chandler.

28 thoughts on “A Good Year For Silas Chandler

  1. Ron Baumgarten

    Great pic, Kevin, and great article. The actual history is much more interesting and compelling than the myths that have grown up around the story, but I guess that myths are an easier way to sell T-shirts and ease consciences! (Btw, having just finished the article, I was well-equipped to deal with the issue of Black Confederates when it was raised during my recent tour of President Lincoln’s Cottage in DC!)

    Reply
    1. Kevin Levin Post author

      Thanks for the kind words and glad to hear that it came in handy during your tour of Lincoln’s Cottage. By the way, congrats on managing to maintain a really high quality Civil War blog.

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      1. Ron Baumgarten

        It really is telling that the issue came up during a part of the tour dealing with the U.S.C.T. In fact, it was a local congressman on the tour who raised the topic, and the guide was well prepared to handle it. I chimed in with a few facts as well. I have a feeling that the guide had dealt with the Black Confederate issue before, and the congressman surely was familiar with the Virginia text book controversy.

        Thanks for the kind words. It means a lot coming from a historian and blogger such as you!

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        1. Myra Chandler Sampson

          Thanks Kevin, I agree that Silas had a very good year. I would like to thank all of the people that have been so supportive and encouraging here at cwmemory. The magazine was something that the entire family celebrated with great pride during the holidays. It was so interesting to see different family members find the magazine at different locations all over the country and clean the shelves by buying all that were available. Other family members also took pictures reading the history to the children. We now have something that we can physically hold in our hands and say to the children, “this is the true story of your great, great, great, grandfather. I have continued my research and have discovered information about Silas’ immediate family, his mother, siblings, grandmother etc. I would like to wish Kevin and Michaela and all of you the best for the New Year.

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          1. Margaret D. Blough

            Myra-

            A wonderful photo and a wonderful article. It’s a wonderful phenomenon that, when an article like this comes out, it can unlock a treasure trove of information that’s out there waiting to find a focus.

            I have two copies of that issue of the magazine: One that I bought at a local Barnes & Noble and the other I bought at the Harrisburg, PA, Amtrak Station’s newstand (I decided I wanted to read it on the train but I’d left my original copy at home so I picked up another.).

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    1. Kevin Levin Post author

      Only someone as mean spirited as you would say this. Of course, you don’t go out looking for trouble. You are just an innocent victim of the personal attacks of others.

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      1. Margaret D. Blough

        I’d call her a grinch, but I’d be concerned about offending grinches who deserve better than to be lumped in with Ms. C.C.

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        1. Kevin Levin Post author

          It reflects someone who is desperate for attention. I once dubbed her Civil War Memory’s “Mean Old Lady.”

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      1. Kevin Levin Post author

        Keep in mind that this is all Connie is capable of doing. Still no response by the SHPG to my invitation to respond to this essay. Just a lot of huffing and puffing and protesting.

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        1. Myra Chandler Sampson

          Actually I consider it a compliment. She must think that the photo is too good to be true if she thinks that it was photo shopped. It doesn’t annoy me since I know that it was not

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          1. Brooks Simpson

            It’s a wonderful photo. Clearly Connie Chastain objects to seeing black people learn about their history.

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            1. Kevin Levin Post author

              In her follow-up response Connie suggested that it was her experience with photoshop that led her to that conclusion. That’s why she is CWM’s “Mean Old Lady”.

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          1. Kevin Levin Post author

            “Amanda” accuses Eric Jacobson of being associated with the Aryan Nation, but says nothing about this guy. What a knucklehead.

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              1. Brooks Simpson

                Let’s just set it forth: the SHPG not only does not have a “zero tolerance” for racists and bigots, but the group actually welcomes them as “acquaintances” and “friends.”

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                1. Andy Hall

                  I’ve never met Lyons, but by odd coincidence I’ve known him by reputation from long before ever attracted the attention of the SPLC, or anyone at SHPG ever heard of him. Only later, much later, did I learn of his “heritage” activities (both odious and ludicrous, but I cannot say any of it much surprised me.

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    2. Brooks Simpson

      Connie’s just jealous because she has no evidence that anyone reads what she writes. That’s why she comes on other people’s blogs. She’s desperate for an audience … well, except for her very, *very* good acquaintance, Dr. Michael Hill of the League of the South.

      Reply
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