Category Archives: Uncategorized

Publisher of Blacks in Gray Uniforms Threatens Legal Action

This morning I received an email from the president of Fonthill Media threatening me with legal action because of my blog post about Phillip Thomas Tucker’s book Blacks in Gray Uniforms (America Through Time Publishers).

The initial email failed to point out anything specific that was problematic in the post, but the author made it very clear: “…I cannot allow you to do damage to my commercial trading without redress. I invite you to desist, if you do not I will immediately request our attorney to commence action against you on the basis of damage to corporate reputation.” Continue reading

New to the Civil War Memory Library, 06/29

Update: My first book, Remembering the Battle of the Crater: War as Murder was recently released in paperback. You can order it directly from the publisher with a 30% discount by using the code (FS30) at checkout. I am just about finished putting together the index for Interpreting the Civil War at Museums and Historic Sites, which will be released in September, if not before. You can also pre-order this book at 30% off directly from the publisher with the code (RLFANDF30).

Many of you will be happy to hear that Searching For Black Confederates: The Civil War’s Most Persistent Myth is almost finished. The manuscript will be submitted to the publisher by the end of September. Stay tuned for more information on this front.

And now here is what is on my reading table:

Philip D. Dillard, Jefferson Davis’s Final Campaign: Confederate Nationalism and the Fight to Arm Slaves (Mercer University Press, 2017).

Kevin M. Kruse, White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism (Princeton University Press, 2005).

Ann M. Little, The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright  (Yale University Press, 2016).

Steven E. Sodergren, The Army of the Potomac in the Overland and Petersburg Campaigns: Union Soldiers and Trench Warfare, 1864-1865 (Louisiana State University Press, 2017).

Bobbie Swearingen Smith ed., A Palmetto Boy: Civil War-Era Diaries and Letters of James Adams Tillman (University of South Carolina Press, 2010).

Next Up, St. Louis’s Confederate Monument

Update: As of this morning [8 June] the monument is being dismantled. Video here.

Recent high profile debates about the removal of Confederate monuments have centered on important military and political leaders such as Robert E. Lee and Jefferson Davis. Monuments to both men have been removed at the University of Texas at Austin and New Orleans. The Charlottesville city council recently voted to remove its Lee Monument and Baltimore is in the process of evaluating a monument that commemorates both Lee and Stonewall Jackson. Continue reading

Robert E. Lee and his Body Servant Sell Washing Machines

Confederate generals such as Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson were used to sell a wide range of consumer goods at the turn of the twentieth century throughout the South and beyond. Interestingly, this G.E. advertisement appeared in the New York Tribune. Let’s hear it for the cultural reach of the Confederate body servant.

Civil War Memory Wants to Partner With You

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Are you looking to connect your product or project with a large and engaged community of Civil War enthusiasts? If so, advertising at Civil War Memory may be just what you are looking for.

Civil War Memory is an award-winning blog that has been in continuous operation for 11 years. Readers come from a wide range of backgrounds, including history teachers, popular and academic historians, and Civil War enthusiasts. It is a community that values history education, historic preservation, and embraces the latest scholarship. Continue reading

Slaveholding in Robert E. Lee’s Army

Glatthaar Table

The latest issue of the Journal of the Civil War Era (September 2016) includes Joseph Glatthaar’s Robert Fortenbaugh Memorial Lecture, which compares the cultures in the Army of the Potomac and Army of Northern Virginia. The essay includes a number of helpful graphs, including the one above, which shows that slaveholders were over represented in Lee’s army compared with the rest o the slave states. Continue reading

It Was Ten Years Ago Today

Ten years ago today I wrote my first blog post. Below is a screenshot of what the site looked like during that first week. I couldn’t help but chuckle as I explored the page. At first glance it looks so incredibly flimsy and bare, but that is only in light of what has changed over the last decade. What you see remains the core of the site. For much of its life I thought of Civil War Memory as a blog, but I now think of it as a website that contains a blog. This is, in part, a function of how blogging platforms like WordPress have evolved over the years, but it has much more to do with the way in which blogging has transformed my life as an educator and historian.

Screenshot of Civil War Memory (November 2005)

In 2005 there were just a few of us blogging the Civil War as you can see in the screenshot’s blogroll. Ten years later there isn’t enough time in the day to read them all. Many of them are incredibly thoughtful. It’s especially encouraging to see so many students at the undergraduate and graduate levels sharing their research on blogs. The debate over the place of social media in education and the historical profession has thankfully subsided. If I contributed even a tiny bit to its spread as a platform for historians and students of history than my time here was worth it. Continue reading

The Passing of a Pioneer in History Blogging

with Ralph Luker, Mark Grimsley, and Rebecca Goetz at the 2007 SHA in Richmond

with Ralph Luker, Mark Grimsley, and Rebecca Goetz at the 2007 SHA in Richmond

I was very sad to hear this morning of the passing of Ralph Luker. Ralph taught American history at a number of schools and was the author of numerous studies. He also edited two volumes of the Martin Luther King Jr. Papers. Many of you, however, know Ralph from his days at History News Network’s Cliopatria blog. Our paths crossed almost immediately after I started blogging back in 2005. Even at that early stage Ralph was already promoting history blogging and bloggers. In 2007 Civil War Memory was awarded Cliopatria’s Best Individual Blog.

Ralph was a huge supporter of my blogging early on and understood how I was trying to leverage it to promote my research beyond the site itself. He introduced me to various historians and on more than one occasion recommended me for inclusion on conference panels. Ralph was incredibly generous and I remain very grateful. Continue reading