Tag Archives: Confederate Flag

“Confederate Kids Have No Rights The Courts Are Bound to Respect”

Today Chief Trial Counsel Kirk Lyons of the Southern Legal Resource Center announced that the Supreme Court will not hear a case involving Candice Hardwick, who ten years ago was sent home for wearing a t-shirt to school with a Confederate flag. He is apparently quite upset about the court’s decision given his firm belief that his client has a rock solid case.

I have to say that I am very disappointed that we have been deprived of the opportunity to hear Kirk Lyons argue in front of the highest court in the land. As for precedent, Lyons argues that this “case is a lot like the Dred Scott decision.” He goes on to suggest that, “Confederate kids have no rights the courts are bound to respect.” Oh, what fun.

Kanye West’s Confederate Heritage

Kanye WestNo, it’s not a new Dixie Outfitters design for the bad-ass biker in you that wants to show off your Confederate pride. In fact, it’s a t-shirt design for Kanye West’s Yeezus Tour. West’s publicity team is marketing a number of times that features the Confederate flag.

This is not the first time that African Americans have appropriated the flag for their own use. A Confederate flag draped over the grim reaper is quite suggestive. Perhaps it symbolizes the death of the Confederacy and racism. I have no idea.

It’s encouraging to think that young black and white Americans, who purchase this shirt will help to blur to the point of non-recognition the history of this flag’s connection to a failed revolution to perpetuate slavery and history of racism and violence.

In other words, they will flag it into oblivion.

About that Flag In Front of the White House

Once again, Ta-Nehisi Coates nails it:

It is the wisdom of the crowd that matters. The wisdom that marked Sunday’s crowd was the idea that the president “bows down to Allah” and needs to “put the Qu’ran down.” The wisdom that marked Sunday’s crowd was the notion that Obama was not the president of “the people” but the president of “his people.” The wisdom of Sunday’s crowd held that the police, doing their job, looked “like something out of Kenya.” It’s not so much that a man would fly a Confederate flag, as Jeff Goldberg notes, in front of the home of a black family. It’s that a crowd would allow him the comfort of doing it. Continue reading