Marcus M. Porter’s Eternal Bivouac

Evergreen Cemetery in Stoughton, MA

Evergreen Cemetery in Stoughton, MA

Yesterday students in my Civil War Memory class handed in their final projects. They are amazing and reflect a good deal of research and creativity. Students researched Civil War monuments and memorials in their own communities or designed their own for a specific location. One student created a video that explored a number of Civil War monuments in Stoughton, including this unusual grave marker, which I thought was worth sharing.

From Find A Grave:

Marcus Morton Porter (1841-1921). Porter enlisted as a private on October 15,1862, in Company G, 47th Massachusetts Infantry, and was mustered out on September 1, 1863. He was a member of Post 72, GAR. Porter became a member of the Old Stoughton Musical Society in 1893 and served as the society’s president from 1911 to 1913.

This particular student admitted that she has never enjoyed living in Stoughton, but that working on this project left her feeling more closely connected to her community.

Mission Accomplished.

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New To the Civil War Memory Library, 03/21

Michael Adams

Also wrote “Our Masters the Rebels” (1978)

Michael C.C. Adams, Living Hell: The Dark Side of the Civil War (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014).

Shauna Devine, Learning from the Wounded: The Civil War and the Rise of American Medical Science (University of North Carolina Press, 2014).

Michael Kreyling, A Late Encounter with the Civil War (University of Georgia Press, 2013).

Louis P. Masur, The Soiling of Old Glory: The Story of a Photograph That Shocked America (Bloomsbury Press, 2008).

K. Stephen Prince, Stories of the South: Race and the Reconstruction of Southern Identity, 1865-1915 (University of North Carolina Press, 2014).

Brian Steel Wills, Confederate General William Dorsey Pender: The Hope of Glory (Louisiana State University Press, 2014).

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Jefferson Davis Welcomes Students Studying Civil Rights Movement

Jefferson Davis Monument

Jefferson Davis Monument

On Sunday I head out with roughly 35 students and 3 colleagues for a 5-day tour of the Civil Rights South. We’ve been meeting with students to give them a broad outline of the history and questions that will be covered as we travel from Atlanta to Memphis.

One of my main responsibilities will be to help students make connections between the Civil War and the Civil Rights Movement through a close examination of monuments and memorials. I want students to understand that the visual reminders of the civil rights struggle are fairly recent additions to the landscape and that they exist in some tension with reminders of the Civil War and the Lost Cause. [click to continue…]

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“We Learned How the South Was Right”

Looks like the Sam Davis Youth Camp is stepping up efforts to recruit children for their summer camp program. Any time an instructor proudly proclaims that participants will learn the “truth of history” you know that good old indoctrination is what is really taking place. [click to continue…]

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Worse Than Hurricane Katrina

Earlier today the Sun Herald, which serves the Biloxi-Gulfport community in Mississippi published a pretty harsh editorial against the leadership of Beauvoir in the wake of the resignation of Jefferson Hayes-Davis. Here is the editorial in full. If I read this correctly the editors at the Sun Herald believe that the Mississippi Division, Sons of Confederate Veterans has the potential to do more damage to Beauvoir’s and Jefferson Davis’s legacy than Hurricane Katrina.

Beauvoir’s recovery from Hurricane Katrina was never a certainty. Yet until just a few weeks ago, it seemed Beauvoir had not only regained lost ground, but was advancing as never before. Now Beauvoir, a landmark on the beachfront since 1852, appears to be in full retreat.

Katrina’s storm surge destroyed five of the seven buildings on the grounds of the Jefferson Davis Home and Presidential Library. It left the two still standing — Beauvoir itself and the new presidential library-museum — heavily damaged. While it was determined that Beauvoir, Davis’ last home, could be restored, it was decided the library-museum building would have to be demolished and rebuilt a little higher above, and a little further from the shoreline. Money could and would accomplish those feats. [click to continue…]

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