Category Archives: William Mahone/Crater

On the Eve of the 150th Anniversary of the Crater

Porto from our hotel balcony. Notice the warehouses filled with port at bottom.

Porto from our hotel balcony. Notice the warehouses filled with port wine at the bottom.

Hope everyone is doing well. My wife and I just returned from a wonderful trip to Portugal that included Lisbon and Porto. The food was amazing, the people are incredibly friendly, and best of all you can enjoy the country on a fairly limited budget. Continue reading

 

Heading to Gettysburg… Again

Tomorrow my wife and I head to Gettysburg for the weekend. On Saturday afternoon at 3:30 I will deliver a presentation (followed by a book signing at 4:30) as part of the Gettysburg Foundation’s Sacred Trust Talks on the massacre of United States Colored Troops by Confederates at the Crater. It looks like an amazing line-up of speakers. I have the unenviable task and honor of following James I. Robertson, but hopefully some people will stick around for my talk. This year the Gettysburg Foundation is going to host a live streaming of every speaker between Friday and Sunday and each talk will eventually be available on YouTube and Vimeo. Continue reading

 

Destination Petersburg 150th

PNB/Crater 150I thought we would never get here, but in roughly two weeks the 150th anniversary of the Petersburg Campaign kicks off. The staff at the Petersburg National Battlefield has put together a helpful handbook [PDF] that includes all the information you need related to events between mid-June and the end of September. There is quite a lot taking place this summer and fall. From what I’ve heard the crowds have been impressive throughout the commemoration of the Overland Campaign, which is a great sign that public enthusiasm can be sustained.

As you might expect I am very excited about the 150th anniversary of the Crater. I will be in Petersburg beginning on July 29 through August 2. On August 1 there will be two panel discussions on aspects of the battle of the Crater and at 7pm I will be delivering an address on the battle and Civil War memory. The location for the panels and my talk has yet to be decided.

I am so looking forward to the commemoration and I am honored to be a part of it. Hope to see some of you on the Crater battlefield at the crack of dawn on July 30.

 

Lecture on the Crater Tomorrow Night in Walpole

Walpole Lecture on CraterFor those of you in the Boston area I will be speaking tomorrow evening at 6:30pm at the Walpole Public Library on the battle of the Crater. I am going to talk specifically about the experiences of white Union soldiers and how they responded to having to fight alongside a division of black soldiers. The talk is based on an essay that I recently completed for an edited volume on the Petersburg Campaign that is still in progress and that I hope to be able to share more about in the near future.

I do hope that some of you can make it. I will have books available at a discounted price, which I will be happy to sign. Some of you will remember that I recently blogged about Walpole High’s little Confederate heritage fetish. Perhaps it will come up.

Looking ahead, some of you will be interested in this summer’s Sacred Trust Talks, sponsored by the Gettysburg Foundation in July. I will be speaking on July 5 at 3:30pm followed by a book signing in the Visitor Center lobby. I doubt very many people will be coming to see me, but I am following James I. Robertson so hopefully a few people will stick around.

 

Remembering the Battle of the Crater Reviewed in Civil War History

Civil War HistoryThanks to Benjamin Cloyd – author of an excellent study of the history and memory of Civil War prisons – for the very fair review of my book in the most recent issue of Civil War History (March 2014). I should have focused much more on the intersection of the centennial and the civil rights movement in Petersburg.

Cloyd identifies what I now clearly see as the weaker sections of my book. This is likely the last review to appear in an academic journal and overall I am pleased with how the book has been received by the scholarly community.  Continue reading